Stimulating a Canadian Narrative for Climate Action

For the last few years, I’ve been working with a group of over 60 scholars, scientists, and decision-makers from throughout Canada, and representing multiple disciplines and backgrounds, to discover and promote possible pathways towards a low-carbon economy.

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Working together with this group, and with representatives from civil society from Coast to Coast to Coast, we produced a set of insights and recommendations for climate change actions and potential models for engagement.

The resulting article, Stimulating a Canadian Narrative for Climate, was just published through Open Access in FACETS. Click on the picture below to access the article in full text.

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New Article: IPCC Reports & Indigenous Inclusion

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change guides global thought and action on climate change, bridging research, science, policy, and politics.

Yet, as we argue in a newly-published paper in Nature Climate Change, Indigenous voices, issues, and perspectives have been under-represented, leading to disparities in representation and gaps in policy and recommendations. We argue that the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) needs to better incorporate Indigenous leadership, knowledge, and ways of knowing in order to provide a more accurate and robust representation of climate change, mitigation, and adaptation.

Abstract

The IPCC is the leading international body for the assessment of climate change, forming the interface between science, policy and global politics. Indigenous issues have been under-represented in previous IPCC assessments. In this Perspective, we analyse how indigenous content is covered and framed in the Working Group II (WGII) portion of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). We find that although there is reference to indigenous content in WGII, which increased from the Fourth Assessment Report, the coverage is general in scope and limited in length, there is little critical engagement with indigenous knowledge systems, and the historical and contextual complexities of indigenous experiences are largely overlooked. The development of culturally relevant and appropriate adaptation policies requires more robust, nuanced and appropriate inclusion and framing of indigenous issues in future assessment reports, and we outline how this can be achieved.

IPCC Article released