Mental Health & Our Changing Climate

Screen Shot 2017-03-30 at 9.48.56 AMIn June 2014, the American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica published an important report, Beyond Storms & Drought: The Psychological Impacts of Climate Change, which outlined the numerous direct and indirect pathways through which climate change and the resulting environmental alterations impact mental health.

Yesterday, an updated report, Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Implications, and Guidance, was released and I am pleased to be an Editor and a Contributor on this report. The shared goal is to continue to increase awareness and understanding of the psychological impacts of climate change, and to continue dialogue on this important topic.

 

From the Introduction to the Report:

It is time to expand information and action on climate and health, including mental health. The health, economic, political, and environmental implications of climate change affect all of us. The tolls on our mental health are far reaching. They induce stress, depression, and anxiety; strain social and community relationships; and have been linked to increases in aggression, violence, and crime. Children and communities with few resources to deal with the impacts of climate change are those most impacted. To compound the issue, the psychological responses to climate change, such as conflict avoidance, fatalism, fear, helplessness, and resignation are growing. These responses are keeping us, and our nation, from properly addressing the core causes of and solutions for our changing climate, and from building and supporting psychological resiliency.

This report also highlights work done in partnership with Inuit from throughout Nunatsiavut.

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eNuk App Featured on CBC’s Spark

In December, our Team was featured on CBC’s Spark, discussing the eNuk app, a community-designed and community-led environment and health monitoring system designed by Inuit in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut.

 

For generations, the Labrador Inuit have relied on traditional knowledge to understand the intricacies of their landscape and seascape: Which ice is safe, where animals congregate, and so on.

But climate change is, well, changing all that.

And in an area where a misstep can cost a life, community members and researchers have come together to make eNuk, a smartphone and tablet app that allows people to share pictures and information about the land.

To listen, click here.

To read a longer article, and watch a short video, click here.

InukBook Project Featured in Canadian Geographic

This past week, members of the InukBook Team attended the Adaptation Canada conference in Ottawa, Ontario, including Dr. Sherilee Harper, Dr. James Ford, Anna Bunce, Derrick Pottle, and Jamie Snook. I had the privilege of representing the team, and presenting our project to a large audience of researchers, decision-makers, government representatives, Indigenous leaders, NGOs.

A journalist from Canadian Geographic wrote a feature on our project, highlighting the potential the InukBook has to support Inuit in making near real-time decisions through active monitoring of environment and health conditions. As an excerpt explains:

All the data that’s collected is specifically meant to meet local and regional needs and priorities,” said Willox. “While we expect much of it will be able to be expanded and inform other parts of the polar North, the key right now is to find a way for Nunatsiavut residents to be able to respond to what they’re experiencing at both the climatic change level and the impacts on health.”

To read the article, click on the picture below.

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Coverage of Climate Change & Mental Health Research

Today, the Toronto Star published the second in a series of articles by Tyler Hamilton examining the many complex facets related to climate change and mental health, and featured our work in Nunatsiavut, Labrador.

Sometimes there are moments in life that change you, that alter you in ways that you can never really fully articulate… and that continue to teach you things years later. This research, and working with the Inuit communities in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, is one of the moments. Hearing the voices, experiences, and wisdom of the people with whom I work is humbling beyond belief. And dealing with, responding too, and hopefully mitigating the mental and emotional impacts of a rapidly changing climate and environment is something that continues, daily, to occupy my thoughts and drive my actions.

 

An excerpt:

Ashlee Cunsolo Willox, an assistant professor of indigenous studies at Cape Breton University, said the connection between mental health and climate change in Canada’s North is growing stronger and in “urgent” need of further investigation.

“There’s this dialogue that’s just waiting to leap out into the national and international consciousness,” she said. “In Canada, we have this active fishing culture, active farming culture, and large Arctic indigenous groups who are on the front lines of climate change, yet we have been really quiet on this topic.”

This is indeed a national dialogue that needs to happen in this country, and we are in a time in this country that I believe there is a willingness and and ability to listen and to act.

Thank you to Tyler Hamilton for his excellent reporting, and for his interest in this topic. His work is making sure this information and these voices get out, and for that, I am eternally grateful.

 

Article in International Innovations Full Release

A feature on our research on climate change and mental health in Nunatsiavut has just reached full release, and I’m pleased to share the links here. Click on the photo below to access the article online, including the embedded documentary and hyperlinks, or to download a pdf copy. Alternatively, click here for a pdf copy.

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Courtesy of International Innovation – a leading scientific dissemination service.

Research Featured in International Innovation in Special Issue on Catalysts for Care

I am happy to share that our work on climate change and mental health has been featured in a special issue of International Innovation: Disseminating Science, Research, and Technology on Catalysts for Care (Issue 185). International Innovation is an open-access publication that features interviews, research, and content from around the world on leading scientific and research breakthroughs, discoveries, and thought. Our team was humbled and honoured to have our work appear in this publication.

A screen shot is available below, but to view the digital version, complete with an embedded link to our documentary film, Attutauniujuk Nunami/Lament for the Land, please view pages 66 and 67 here.

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Two Up-Coming Film Screenings

March is another great month for film screenings for Attutaunijuk Nunami/Lament for the Land. I’m pleased to announce two up-coming screenings happening this week and next.

This Friday, March 13th, Attutaunijuk Nunami is being screened as part the Tracking Shots Aboriginal Cinema Series at Wilfrid Laurier University. While I couldn’t be there in person, I will be participating in a Q&A at the end of the screening virtually. If you’re in the Waterloo area, join us (see poster below).

Next Thursday, March 19th, I have the pleasure of being hosted by the School of Environment at Laurentian University to give a talk and screen the film. If you’re in the Sudbury region, we’d love to have you join (see poster below).

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